An analysis of the characters and three major themes in the play antigone by sophocles

It is always true that, in Sophoclean tragedy, the destiny of the characters follows logically from their own choices.

Perhaps also for this reason, Sophocles, unlike Aeschylus, did not write connected trilogies but allowed each play in a trilogy to deal with a different character and a different story. He too refuses the happiness that Creon offers him and follows Antigone to a tragic demise.

Ultimately she will recant and beg Antigone to allow her to join her in death. The Chorus frames the play with a prologue and epilogue, introducing the action and characters under the sign of fatality.

Ultimately, however, these same heroic flaws destroy the persons whom they once made great. That is to say, they were not originally written to be performed on a single occasion. Yet Sophocles was not content to write tragedies exactly as Aeschylus had done. Antigone, although it concerns the last events in the mythic history of this family, was the first of the three plays to be written.

In it, certain elements of plot seem to indicate that Sophocles, in this early period of his career, was still imitating the works of his predecessor Aeschylus. She introduces an everyday, maternal element into the play that heightens the strangeness of the tragic world. The long passages of monologue, familiar from Aeschylean drama, are now replaced by dialogue.

Haemon appears twice in the play. As he tells Antigone, his only interest is in political and social order. Unlike her beautiful and docile sister, Antigone is sallow, withdrawn, and recalcitrant. Creon suffers because he regards his will as more important than the demands of the gods, although political pressures compelled him to punish the traitor of his city.

The Page is a figure of young innocence. Creon is bound to ideas of good sense, simplicity, and the banal happiness of everyday life. This tendency is quite different from the tragedies of Aeschylus, which usually deal with an entire household or even trace a story over several generations.

Unlock This Study Guide Now Start your hour free trial to unlock this page Sophocles study guide and get instant access to the following: In Sophocles, the individual hero is always at the core of the story. Creon defends the need for law and order in a community, viewing civil law as more important than the will of the Information that the audience needs to understand the plot is allowed to emerge gradually through conversation between the characters.

The gods may predict human suffering, but they are rarely the primary causes of disaster in these works. They are eternally indifferent, innocent, and ready to serve. This psychological motivation is frequently the key to another element of Sophoclean tragedy: In the prologue, he casts a menacing shadow: Along with playing narrator, the Chorus also attempts to intercede throughout the play, whether on the behalf of the Theban people or the horrified spectators.

The real contribution of Sophocles, however, was in his approach to plot and character. Antigone defends the will of the gods, emphasizing the bond that she has to her family more than that which she has toward the state.

Nevertheless, the Theban plays, as they are called, together tell the complete story of Oedipus from the height of his power as king of Thebes to the execution of his daughter for the burial of his son, Polyneices. In the first moments of the play, Antigone is opposed to her radiant sister Ismene.

The entire section is 2, words.Video: Antigone by Sophocles: Summary, Characters & Analysis Learn about Sophocles' 'Antigone' and how it explored the topics of civil disobedience, fidelity, and citizenship.

When you are finished, take the quiz and see what you learned. As with Sophocles' sistes, Ismene and Antigone appear as foils and rivals. Ismene is "reasonable," timid, and obedient, full-figured and beautiful in being a good girl. In contrast, Antigone is recalcitrant, impulsive, and moody, sallow, thin, and decidedly resistant to being a girl like the rest.

Antigone study guide contains a biography of Sophocles, literature essays, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis.

Antigone - The play's tragic heroine.

In the first moments of the play, Antigone is opposed to her radiant sister Ismene. Unlike her beautiful and docile sister, Antigone is sallow, withdrawn, and recalcitrant.

Sophocles World Literature Analysis - Essay

Read an in-depth analysis of Antigone. Sophocles World Literature Analysis - Essay. Sophocles’ approach to character has also affected the construction of his tragedies in other ways.

One of the main themes explored in. Despite the important role of fate in the lives of the characters, Creon, Antigone, Ismene, and Polyneices are all Power The clearest example of power is King Creon of Thebes, who is arrogant, unperceptive, and downright mean to people around him.

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An analysis of the characters and three major themes in the play antigone by sophocles
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